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technology may be the most powerful tool they have to help put a anytime face trace galt gear live in our west coast newsroom to explain how it works. >> while the debate goes on, megyn, on whether to release the surveillance pictures of potential suspects. we can tell you that authorities are saying that they are, quote, pretty clear of the man's face. pretty compelling stuff they say. and it appears to be a younger man. so let me show you how this facial recognition technology works. it's all about measuring the facial features. for example, the eye socket depth, cheekbone shape, the distance between the eyes, the nose width and the jaw line length. they take all these numbers and come up with numerical code or facial print. not the size of a fingerprint but still very very close. e tter of picture, clearly the better chance they hav matching it now, what happens is in mo cases, in fact we use an intern, let's show this video if you are just trying to identify the person is who they say they are that process is simple. take the person's driver's license. take a picture of them, facial c
and the military side. i've constantly tried to improve how we address the need for the next generation technology, public-private cooperation and ensuring that we have the price personnel to counter this 21st century cyberthreat. however, i am uncompromising in safeguarding the rights of our citizens and i will never sacrifice our civil liberties for unneeded intrusion. to this end, the amendment i am offering today would strengthen existing provisions in the bill to include the privacy officer and the officer for civil rights and civil liberties of the department of homeland security askey stakeholders in the report that would a-- as key stakeholders in the report. this report would assess how this legislation affected our civil liberties and privacy throughout our federal government, and the department of homeland security is the -- the key civil department in our federal government that develops and implements cybersecurity protocalls for the rest of the -- protocols for the rest of the federal government. it is crucial that they be part of any assessment and work with both the privacy office
technology, it's the only way to track them. if we invested what we should've in the air traffic system, we would have -- may not solve all of chuck's problems, but a much faster, flowing system. >> by the way, if you modernize it, you can cut back on some of the workforce permanently and save money there. that's the other issue. it's very labor intensive because of the issue that steve just described. >> before we go to break, the president is dining tonight with members of the senate, all women, isn't that nice? >> that's great. >> chuck todd, thank you. we'll see you at 9:00 on the "daily rundown." >> i'm surprised that didn't get ugly just then. >> right. >> that's great. >> we went to counseling. >>> up next, steve rattner has charts on signs of a spring slowdown. more "morning joe" when we come back. but i wondered what a i tcustomer thought? is great, hi nia... nice to meet you nia, i'm mike. what do you drive? i have a ford explorer, i love my car. and you're treating it well? yes i am. there are a lot of places you could take your explorer for service, why do you bring it back to t
time, you could argue that it means a decrease in personnel. because you're using technology, using cameras to replace, you know, eyeballs. but i don't think we've come to that determination. we're down -- the police department is down 6,000 police officers than where we were 11 years ago. so we've already sort of paid the price. and we're using to a certain extent technology to plug the gaps. we're increasing the number of cameras that we have. one of the things that we're doing, we had it in motion prior to the boston marathon. but we want to increase the number of mobile cameras that we have so we can put them up at events and then move them to other events. along our marathon route, we have 220 cameras. but most of them are on bridges. we want to increase at least the public sector cameras that we have along that route. >> all right. new york city police commissioner, ray kelly, thank you very much. it's always good to see you. >> thank you for the great job you keep doing for the city. >> thank you. >>> a new book on afghanistan that's not so good. president hamid karzai had to
technology works. you go into places like grand central station you see some of the devices. they have markings from the epa on it. we also had some project bio shield and some other legislation that create ad group within the department of health and services to contract for things like vaccines and antidotes for some of these agents. we haven't funded early stage science looking at next generation of science to help protect us against future threats. jenna: being you worked in the government and the private sector what do you think is the government's role in that? some of us think, the government must have vials of antidotes stashed somewhere when something happens to help us. where is the government's role in this? where is the private sector and how do we best prepare if that is something we should be watching for? >> we'll have to provide substantial incentives for people to do the investment there is no natural market. the government is only purchaser. they trade the antidotes to hope to get stockpiled by the government and that is not a good environment. when companies lose out
shows in terms of sales volume, and we all know how we're using our technology more and more every day for our personal lives and how we defend on it. for example, the national shooting sports foundation surveyed owners of modern sporting rifles in 2010 and found that 10% of them, 10% of all rifles sold had purchased their firearms at gun shows, whereas 25% had purchased them online. 25%. believe me, i understand the political stakes for my colleagues and i sympathize. i have been there. i understand it. and comes from states like west virginia, and no state has a higher regard for the second amendment rights to bear arms than my state. in fact, on the great seal of the state of west virginia, the preamble is montani sember liberai. in latin, that means mountaineers are always free. you know how we feel. one of the review states that became a state during the civil war, broke away from virginia at that time. but west virginians are also guided by a little common sense. i have said this. in west virginia, we know what nonsense is, we know what common sense is, and now we know what gun s
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6